How to dress like Cary Grant guide part 3

Cary Grant’s Style Tips

How to dress like Cary Grant guide part 3

The history of Mr. Cary Grant, number 6:

A tremendous success at the box office, I’m No Angel was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Picture which saved Paramount at the time from declaring bankruptcy, but pushed Grant into a long series of unsuccessful film projects until 1936 when he signed with Columbia Pictures. With his comedic timing from his years as an acrobat and stilt walker, he was picked to star in the 1937 comedy Topper which was distributed by MGM. Then The Awful Truth came out that same year which fully established Grant as a sophisticated leading man with a gentle comedic touch. It was rare in a time of masculine enforced male stars, but Grant used his gift of grace as a way to lighten things up and play various roles as opposed to being typecast simply as a good looking man.

The history of Mr. Cary Grant, number 7:

Many argue that Grant was such a successful actor because of his upbringing. According to Grant, he was always pretending to be someone else and he even once wrote “I pretended to be somebody I wanted to be and I finally became that person. Or he became me. Or we met at some point.” Considering he had a challenging childhood, many attribute Grant’s style and manners as nothing short of miraculous, but Grant spent hours researching and watching men he admired in an effort to become more domesticated and less like the hooligan he once was, spouting off jazzy street talk instead of focusing on proper grammar. According to Grant of the pivotal moments for him in creating his “personality” was watching Leo McCarey, the director of The Awful Truth who had manners and a level of sophisticated grace like Grant had never seen before. His mannerisms and intonations resembled Grant’s, and he used McCarey as a learning tool to further his passion for Savoir-Vivre.

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