How to spot a fake Hermès ties guide part 7

The top 5 colors to choose when wearing a tie

How to spot a fake Hermès ties guide part 7

How to distinguish a fake from a genuine Hermès tie, number 14: notice the tie keeper

It is attached in four spots and fakes often have that label in addition to a tie keeper loop made out of the fabric. If you ever see a Hermès tie with a tie keeper made out of the same fabric as the tie, it is a fake. Also if the tie keeper is printed, it is likewise a fake because all Hermès ones are woven. Up until the 1970s, Hermès had a woven keeper loop that had either a burgundy, a white, a blue or a black background color with a white Hermès H. Ever since the 80s, printed Hermès silk ties would usually have dry clean only on the left followed by a carriage and 100% silk on the right. The background colors could have been in black, navy or red with a white font or white with dark font. Interestingly, if you count the spokes in the wheel you will get the number six, whereas the printed stamp on tie has five spokes. That is also a good way to figure out if there is a fake because fakers usually do not pay attention to those small details.

How to distinguish a fake from a genuine Hermès tie, number 15:

Surprisingly, the printed silk Hermes ties from the 2018 collection did not just have a different pattern mark but they also had a different tie keeper. It now says dry clean only on the left, made in France on the right. It has the horse carriage as well as the words Hermès Paris woven into the underneath of it. This is typically a label that was only used on scarf ties on heavy twill, loured silk ties, as well as woven ties but not on the traditional weight printed silk twill ties.

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