How to spot a fake Hermès ties guide part 6

The top 5 colors to choose when wearing a tie

How to spot a fake Hermès ties guide part 6

How to distinguish a fake from a genuine Hermès tie, number 12: evaluate the Hermès logo on the slimmer side

Hermès pays great attention to details so if the stamp is off-center or turned a little bit I would be cautious because it could be a fake. Moreover, take a closer look at the spokes in the wheel. You only see five spokes not more and not less.

How to distinguish a fake from a genuine Hermès tie, number 13: observe the pattern mark

All printed Hermes ties in their twill have a pattern mark to identify the designer and the design number. It is rectangular and it aligns with the edge fold of the tie. The top line should read made in France, all in caps, Sans Serif. The middle line should have a pattern number followed by the initials of the Artist. Those are in a serif font. Up until the early 70s, the pattern mark only had two lines. So if your stamp did not have the copyright symbol, your pattern mark should only have two lines. Thereafter, Hermes added a third line to a pattern mark which reads 100% “soie” which means silk in French. The “soie” should be all caps again and San Serif just like the first line. Fakers usually do not get that right and they have the font all either in Serif or San Serif and that is a good way to identify a fake.

How to distinguish a fake from a genuine Hermès tie, number 14: notice the tie keeper

By that, I mean the little-woven label in the back of Herms ties that you can use to stick the slimmer and the tie through. Unlike many other ties, the keeper loop in these ties is not made out of the tie silk but it is a simple woven label that is much slimmer.

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