How to spot a fake Hermès ties guide part 5

The top 5 colors to choose when wearing a tie

How to spot a fake Hermès ties guide part 5

How to distinguish a fake from a genuine Hermès tie, number 10: find the slip stitch

All Hermes ties are hand sewn with a thread that is 177 centimeters long, that is just shy of 67 inches. Since all Hermes ties are hand sewn in a flexible way, you can gently pull on the fold and see whether there is some slight irregularities in the stitching and also the tie is flexible. If you see dense machine stitching, it is definitely not a genuine product.

How to distinguish a fake from a genuine Hermès tie, number 11: find the loop thread

Because ties can stretch and they are made out of different layers, you need a thread that has a reserve and that reserve in Hermes ties is in the loop. Generally, all Hermès ties have the loop on the backside of the wider end of the tie. Simply fold up the top layers and try to find that little loop. On new Hermès ties, it is generally always there. On used ties, it may not be there anymore if they have been stretched out and the reserve has been consumed and is now in a part where it is not easily visible anymore.

How to distinguish a fake from a genuine Hermès tie, number 12: evaluate the Hermès logo on the slimmer side

On regular silk twill ties, you will always find this Hermès stamp on the front side of the slim blade. On a tie, it should say Hermès Paris all in caps and have a copyright symbol. The copyright symbol first appeared in the 1970s. Hermès ties that are older than that will not have it so do not be afraid if you do not find the c, it can still be a genuine Hermès tie. Always check to see that the stamp was printed on at the tie and not sewn on or glued on because those would be hallmarks of a fake.

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