A guide to trouser cuffs part 1

A guide to trouser cuffs

A guide to trouser cuffs part 1

History of turn-ups, number 1:

Historically, the origins of cuffs stemmed from a time where you would turn up the bottom hem of your trouser in muddy weather. In 1890, the then Prince of Wales who later became King Edward the seventh introduced the permanent turn-up which was there just for fashion reasons and was not a necessity due to outside weather conditions.

History of turn-ups, number 2:

Cuffed pants became the norm for businesswear between the 1890s and the 1940s. During World War II, there was a fabric shortage and so it was decided to forego the cuff or the turn-up so you could save on a fabric and create more garments instead.

History of turn-ups, number 3:

Ever since the 1950s, cuffed trousers have gone in and out of fashion but over the years, they have always remained, they have always come back and likely they will always come back even though they might not be super fashionable at this point in time. By the way, the British refer to cuffs as things you have on your sleeve versus on the pants or trousers, they are called turn-ups. Sometimes Savile Row tailors also call them PTUs or permanent turn-ups. At the end of the day, they are all the same.

When do you typically see cuffs on trouser hems? Number 1:

You definitely see them in suits and in Italy, I would say the majority of suits will have the cuff. They are also popular in white-collar professions with lawyers, bankers, and the like. Cuffs can help to make a suit silhouette look more grounded especially when you have vertical stripes such as a pinstripe or a rope stripe. In terms of the seasons, you can find cuffs anywhere from flannel suits or tweed suits all the way up to summery seersucker suits.

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