Glued/fused, half canvas and full canvas, suit construction guide part 3

Glued/fused, half canvas and full canvas suit construction guide

Glued/fused, half canvas and full canvas, suit construction guide part 3

Full canvas suit construction, number 2:

Full canvas construction is much stiffer and feels like it but it has crisp look that you sometimes know from military garments or evening wears such as tuxedos or tailcoats. However, if you really want to look your best, you should go for something crisp and springy because it simply has the most beautiful lines.

Full canvas suit construction, number 3:

If you go with a stiffer interlining, it smoothes over any kind of bumps or imperfections in your body so it would be much easier to fit. It takes about an hour per lapel to sew the canvas to the fabric so it stays in shape and looks good. Fortunately, it does not wear out. The handmade jacket gets better as you wear it and you will never have issues with blisters and you wear the fabric out before there is an issue with the canvass. To achieve the lapel roll, you have to take the interlining, the canvas, and the fabric, angle it and then sew it, that way it stays in shape and will always go back to that angle. The lapel roll is a quality hallmark.

Full canvas suit construction, number 4:

To cut costs, one German company came up with a machine that enabled to sew the lapels while they are angled but first, they had to be operated by hand but it saved a lot of time. Today they have a special machine which sews it fully automatically and you can do a lapel in one minute. The great thing is, it comes with a left side and a right side because of the lapels or angled in a different direction. A good operator can work on two machines at the same time which means you actually get four lapels in one minute.

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