Mens Suit Blog

  • 9 Essential Items For A Minimalistic Wardrobe

    The Perfect Shirt Checklist Part Three

    We are still on the fit because it is the most important item on this checklist and the latest of these three parts of shirt fit.

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  • 9 Essential Items For A Minimalistic Wardrobe

    The Perfect Shirt Checklist Part Two

    Ok, we are talking about the fit. Next fit is also very important on this checklist.

    Checklist Item Number One- Fit ( Part two )

    • Torso Fit- Always dress for your body type. A larger guy is needs 2.5 – 3.5 inches of extra fabric around his torso to make movement comfortable whereas a smaller guy needs less excess material. If you can see your shirt fabric straining around the buttons – pay particular attention to the chest area and lower buttons – your shirt is too tight. If your shirts sag and billow at the sides, and bunches up under the arms – it’s too baggy.
    • Arm Holes- The arm holes of your shirt are often overlooked. Higher armholes give you a wider range of movement and many men find them less restrictive. Lower armholes allow more air to circulate inside the shirt but don’t offer this extra freedom of movement. If you notice an abundance of fabric hanging under your arm, your arm holes are too big. This is one part of the shirt you can’t have altered so if you find your arm holes aren’t working for you, you need to go for a tailored shirt.
    • Sleeve Length- Your shirt cuffs should not ride up your forearm when you raise your arms over your head or out to the sides. You should not be able to see your wrists when your arms are down by your sides. If this is happening, you need a longer sleeve length. Ideally, your sleeves should reach the base of your thumb. You should be able to see 1/2 inch of the sleeve when wearing a jacket or blazer. If your sleeves are too long, your shirt fabric will bunch at the cuff when your arms are down by your sides and your sleeves will extend over your thumb and on to your hand.

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  • 9 Essential Items For A Minimalistic Wardrobe

    The Perfect Shirt Checklist Part One

    The right shirt can make you look like million bucks, but the wrong shirt it is a waste of money. That is why you should see this checklist.

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  • Tips For Wearing A Short Sleeved Shirts

    Sleeve length guide part 2

    In menswear, one of the most discussed topics is the correct sleeve length of shirts and jackets.

    Tips for correct sleeve length, number 4: Shirt cuff must not be too wide otherwise it slides down

    If your shirt cuff is so wide that you can slide your hand through with the cufflinks in it, you will likely have the problem that your cuff slides onto your hand. Not only does that look like you got a shirt from your older brother, but it also results in unsightly wrinkles. The other problem you might experience is that the shirt cuff is wider than the jacket sleeve, causing it to catch the sleeve.

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  • Tips For Wearing A Short Sleeved Shirts

    Sleeve length guide part 1

    Tips for correct sleeve length, number 1:

    Ideally, a French cuff shirt should reach to the root of the thumb at all times, even when you move. If your cuff moves when you lift your arms, you have a problem with the armhole or not enough shirt length. Your shirt armholes could be too big, or they could be bigger than your sleeve, thus pulling the shirt sleeve up when you move. To avoid that, choose a shirt armhole that is big enough to make you comfortable but small enough to keep the shirt cuff at the right length.

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  • Men’s Frames Guide: Which Type of Glasses Look Best on Your Face?

    The eyeglasses guide part 5

    Different styles of eyeglasses, number 3:

    Round metal glasses have long been the choice for counter-culture, resistance and youth-culture movements, and now they are reentering the mainstream. Favored by Steve Jobs, Mahatma Gandhi, John Lennon, and even Harry Potter, they are a bold statement by someone who feels they fall just outside of the mainstream. Today, they can be found in true round shapes to softened round shapes that are a little less aggressive.

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  • Men’s Frames Guide: Which Type of Glasses Look Best on Your Face?

    The eyeglasses guide part 4

    After the horror of the eyewear in the 1980s and 1990s, eyeglasses have turned a sartorial corner. They are no longer dreaded but necessary accessories, because classic styles are making a comeback. Now glasses are affordable, optional accessories that you can use not only to correct your vision but to boost your style as well.

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  • Men’s Frames Guide: Which Type of Glasses Look Best on Your Face?

    The eyeglasses guide part 3

    Eyeglasses construction, number 2: Plastic

    Cellulose acetate is a plastic polymer that is made from wood pulp. Unlike other plastics which can be made from chemicals and petroleum, cellulose acetate is a plant-based plastic that is molded into sheets. Individual frames are then cut from the sheet and hand polished, which is more resource intensive than extruding plastic and therefore more expensive. Acetate is stiffer, heavier and more durable than standard plastic. Multi-colored patterns such as tortoiseshell are far more beautiful in acetate since the patterns were created over an entire sheet. Standard plastic must be molded or worse, painted, to achieve the same effect. In general, plastics like acetate are hypoallergenic. The main disadvantages are that they are more difficult to adjust, they are heavier than metal, and under stress, they can break or snap. Given the choice, I would recommend seeking out acetate for its beauty and durability.

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  • Men’s Frames Guide: Which Type of Glasses Look Best on Your Face?

    The eyeglasses guide part 2

    Like sunglasses, glasses can have a powerful effect on your style statement.

    Good things about eyeglasses, number 2:

    Eyeglasses are finally more affordable. With low-cost online eyeglass retailers lining up to take your business where there were once only high-cost, cumbersome optical stores, you can now easily find and afford more than one pair, if you want and quality materials are making a comeback. Since glasses are now more about fashion than function, more retailers are offering materials other than basic plastic and metal.

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  • Men’s Frames Guide: Which Type of Glasses Look Best on Your Face?

    The eyeglasses guide part 1

    History of glasses, number 1:

    Glasses have come a long way in the last 700 years. The first mention of eyeglasses in roughly the format we know them today, two-lens corrective frames, in historical texts was in the late 13th century in Italy. Cultures around the world had been experimenting with optics for centuries prior, and the 11th-century Arabic text of the Book of Optics laid the foundation for the creation of modern eyeglasses. By the turn of the 14th century, Venice had established a guild to regulate eyeglasses. This early eyewear employed convex lenses to magnify a subject. The earliest known pair of dual-lens glasses ever discovered was dated to 1400 in Germany.

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